Grooveware-Art: Contrasts and Anomalies

Grooveware is the creative moniker under which I am currently working, producing both 2D and 3D artwork as well as music in a variety of genres. I work from a studio based at the ‘Rotherham Open Arts Renaissance’ space in Rotherham town centre.

Green Man Print

I decided to return to the original drawing I made of a Green Man and use it for a Lino print. Having printed it onto paper, I again tried it on a t-shirt where I think it looks good. The one seen here is on a child-size shirt.

Flattened Drop Box

After seeing how successful the ‘flattening’ of my Green Man image was in developing a t-shirt design, I revisited one of my much earlier sculptures (‘Drop Box’) to see if that would work too. As before, I put the photograph into the Sketch Book App on the iPad and drew around the image before experimenting with filling in the shapes using the fill tool. Above are the resulting images – I think they’ll look pretty good on a t-shirt.

Final Prints

The two print layers are now completed. I initially tried to produce a ‘clean’ print with no evidence of the cutting being shown. However, having made some mistakes at the inking stage, thus showing some of the cut lines, I decided to intentionally include them in the final print. As seen in the pictures, they add a certain, appropriate ‘feel’ to the final image, seemingly more organic. I am happy with the framed print.

Blocks One and Two

These are the completed Lino blocks for printing the Green man logo. The first will be for the red areas (or any other dominant colour) whilst the outline will be in black. Both are seen here in reverse, ready to print. I always take care to try and ensure the pattern left in my cutting is pleasing enough to be possibly included in the print.